asked in Science+Technology by (49 points) 6

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answered by LEGEND (7,489 points) 4 15 39
Why would you even want to do that? Right now this isn't possible. But with the new technology and the 3-D printers, doctors are now able to make a few organs to help repair the damaged one. It is amazing what 3-D printers can do these days. Technology has come a long way and who knows maybe one day they can take a tissue sample from you and clone you a brand new heart. I'm not sure how good this would be if the rest of your body is failing. You can replace certain organs to make a person live longer, but it is the actual body that really matters. An old frail body can't really support these organs if it isn't strong enough. 

If it were up to me and I'd lived a full and happy life I wouldn't want a cloned organ put in me to make me live longer. People actually get tired and in the end, I do believe they welcome the peace of going to sleep and not waking again. They need peace and this is one way they find it in the end. 
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answered by ELITE (3,214 points) 4 7 18

The process of cloning might not be that new per say, but to the majority of people, it's just a theory or an idea yet to be actualized. During the course of my research, I was able to come across certain projects where body parts were cloned for animals and they seem to work pretty fine. Am yet to come across any case where human body parts have been cloned, or maybe it has, not officially though. 

Drawing from the above and my understanding on how cloning works, extending the lifespan of a human via cloned organs won't be possible. Remember it just an added single organ and not a full body clone. To extend a human lifespan through cloning, a 100% process including Molecular and Cell cloning has to be done. In doing so, every single part of the body, in and out, becomes new and can begin to function energetically untill time takes it course and weekens the body again like the natural cycle of life, begining with a body growing older by age. 

For the record, I think organ cloning is a very much welcome idea, health wise. It is a process that will help save a lot of lives, am talking about certain people faced with death due to one or more organ failures. A cloned organ will give such people another chance at life. 

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answered by LEGEND (6,007 points) 5 9 19
There isn't any recorded case in history about human cloning. Some animals have been successful cloned and I think that is the closest we have gotten. From all the research that have been carried out, I think that sort of cloning which you talk about doesn't have to be 100% as in reproductive cloning but Therapeutic cloning.
There's been skepticism about cloning.

Therapeutic cloning doesn't involve the cloning of the entire original copy but just an embryo. However, after cloning this embryo, initiating cell differentiation into desired organ, the embryo would still be destroyed. This is why different groups kick against it as it is not much different from abortion.

Hence, until human organs are successfully cloned, perhaps then they can determine their longevity
replied by ELITE (3,661 points) 6 8 12
I agree, only animals have been tried by cloning, even now they trying to clone dinosaurs and other repltiles that has already vanished.

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