asked in Mental Health & Psychology by
I'm 23 yrs old and I'm the eldest of the family. Is this normal? that I experiencing reoccurring thoughts that I felt the urge to repeat things over and over again. I felt bothered if I did not double check things. Like at home, every night I'm really sure that the door is locked, but still, I'm going to double check it. Every time I clean my room. I'm not satisfied with the first round of cleaning, I want to clean and clean until I'm satisfied with it. Someone told me that maybe I have an obsessive-compulsive disorder, how can I control this kind of situation? can you give some tips to avoid these kinds of thoughts?
replied by LEGEND (6,076 points) 6 9 22
If really you are suffering from OCD I would kindly suggest you check in with a therapist that can help you with your condition. Although it might be that serious compared to other chronic mental disorders but the earlier you seek help the better it would be for you.

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6 Answers

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answered by (22 points) 2
Take it easy and don't stress yourself in controlling your OCD disorder. There are times when all of us have a little control over things especially if we're emotionally driven. Have a break, breathe in and breathe out. After that, settle things first. Talk to your family or close friends about it. Don't also forget to visit a mental health professional or a psychologist about your concern. OCD is a kind of anxiety that's boggling our minds. It is important that you will be the one to help yourself. Set your goal, be driven, and focus. Try to resist, control it and be recovered. Just remember that it takes time, you don't need to stress yourself out. Also, it would be better if you're going to list all your symptoms and boggling situations in a notebook. Try to take away the thoughts slowly but surely until you'll overcome it.
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answered by ELITE (4,052 points) 5 13 41
My daughter suffers from this and hers manifests itself in checking everything to make sure her house is locked up when she goes out. It used to take her ages to get out of the house because of her checking. You're not alone, there are many people like you.  I think hers stemmed from the fact her brother was very dishonest and used to steal from her room so she had to have a lock put on her bedroom door when she was younger.  I don't know whether you can trace yours back to something that happened in your life.

My daughter's OCD is worse when she is stressed about something, if she is worried about work or a personal matter. Since she met her husband (they got married last Saturday!) she has been much better as he has made her feel safe and secure. She did consider therapy at one time but  as hers has improved she didn't need it. I hope you have someone you can talk to about this, someone who will understand, as it definitely helps to talk things through.

Try to avoid situations that will make you feel uncomfortable or stressed, make a list of what you would do in a worse case scenario. You'll probably find this improves as you get older and become more confident but remember you are not alone and you probably pass lots of people in the street each day who are going through a similar thing.
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answered by (291 points) 2 9
I'm very sorry to say that if it's true that you have ODC, at the present time, there is no cure for it. But you can manage it.
One of the main features of OCD is doubt, it was even called '' the doubting disease '' during the 19th century. You doubt the most basic things and some even go on to doubt their sanity and perceptions.  But there are many things you can do to have it under control and live a relatively normal life.

You have to deal with the anxiety those thoughts make you feel, and not with the actual threat you think you're facing. For example, once you clean your room, you'll start thinking that it's not clean enough and that you have to clean it once again, and by doing that you're dealing with what your thoughts are making you fear, that the room might be actually dirty while it's not. You have to start dealing with the thoughts themselves and not with what they're telling you to repeat and do all over again. These thoughts are all symptoms of anxiety, and they can make you feel you're going to have a fire, your family will be murdered, you're going to die in an accident...etc. It doesn't matter what the content of these thoughts is, they all have the same effect on you. They make you anxious.

So the most important thing to do is to start dealing with the anxiety that these thoughts make you feel, and not with the actual content of these thoughts. I really hope you get better soon.
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answered by (21 points) 1

I have a boy neighbour who was diagnosed with ADHD, His parents and mine are close friends. So I was told by my parents about the boy who was diagnosed with ADHD. I visited the website of the ADHD clinic because I'm curious, they have blogs/articles. I'm interested about it because I also love reading articles. so I was enjoying myself reading blogs about ADHD but I was bumped into a topic about OCD, it really gave me knowledge and understanding about OCD because I have a friend who has a problem like you, at first I was annoyed at him because of his attitude like yours but after reading it those articles, It made me realized that I should not be annoyed with that kind of attitude, instead help him  to cope up OCD.

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answered by LEGEND (6,078 points) 2 10 28
I apologize that kind of feeling is bothering you. Actually doing things again and again is truly a waste of time, but there is something with your brain that calls you to do it again just to be sure this time. Imagine the number of minutes wasted that instead of you resting, you are bothered if you do something right. Doing things repetitively is like a relief to you, that is why your brain is telling you to do it over and over. I have a friend that has OCD and what we do when she starts to feel this anxiety disorder is to refocus her attention. When she starts to say, "did I closed my car" we will answer "yes" in group. We also advise her husband that when she started to show this disorder is to refocus her attention so that she will stop thinking those things. She needs her mind pre occupied.
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answered by (23 points) 2
If you simply have a cleaning OCD that is actually pretty normal as long as it isn't upsetting your life.  However, it can get pretty bad.  I was diagnosed with OCD about 15 years ago.  Let me tell you it got pretty bad.  My thoughts would constantly return to the same things over and over. I could not get out of the thought loop I was in.

I had to end up going to the Dr and breaking down and crying over it. I begged and cried for help. It was controlling every single day of my life. I couldn't eat because I was always anxious and stressed with the constant thoughts looping over in my mind. I couldn't sleep. No one could convince me that I was over reacting about things.
Logically I knew something was wrong. However, I had to get to the point to where I KNEW I wasn't going to be able to live the rest of my life in that constant loop of repeating thoughts all day long every day.

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