asked in Health+Fitness by (644 points) 1 3 15
replied by LEGEND (6,072 points) 5 9 22
Respiratory problems can be caused by stove using kerosine when the stove is not properly regulated to produce blue flame as it's burning instead it allowed to burn with poisonous hydrocarbon flame. This noxious hydrocarbon flame can get into one's respiratory tract and  cause respiratory problems such as asthma, choking, suffocation, etc.
replied by ELITE (3,093 points) 4 8 12
Smelling from the fume of kerosine can lead to damage your lungs, and it will make you sick.

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4 Answers

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answered by Patron (1,925 points) 2 5 14
According to doctors and experts, people who use kerosene stoves for cooking on a regular basis do not have more respiratory diseases than those people who use some other form of fuel for cooking as well as their other day to day needs. At the same time, doctors also warn that inhaling kerosene or kerosene fumes is not good for health.

It is because, it might cause a temporary change in the way you smell and feel things. In addition, inhaling kerosene or kerosene fumes might cause some people to become nauseated or dizzy. Breathing the fumes for a long time could result in kidney or neurological damage, and blood clots that damage the heart, brain, and other vital organs.
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answered by LEGEND (6,391 points) 5 9 21
Kerosene is a hydrocarbon and it contain impurities like nitric oxides and sulphur dioxide. These chemical components are the ones responsible for respiratory illnesses and this is how the whole process goes. When someone inhales these hydrocarbons, the pass through the gut to the tracheabronchial tree and affects the lungs. The hydrocarbons cause alveoli to became weak and collapse. This causes suffocation and may lead to pneumonia and other respiratory illnesses. If urgent care or medication isn't taken, this might lead to respiratory failure which may result to death.

In case this emergency, medical advise should be sorted out immediately and the patient should be kept in an open area where they can get free air.  If it's must that you use kerosene stove the ensure you adjust it to non luminous flame because it doesn't produce much smoke.
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answered by Patron (2,403 points) 2 5 13
Yes cooking with kerosine can cause respiratory infection or problem under certain conditions.  Kerosene has more carbon content in it,  so when it burns in air  it either produce carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide . When it is burn in a limited supply of air it gives carbon monoxide and if it burn in excess air  it gives carbon dioxide.
When you cook with kerosene and it burned in limited supply of air,  the gas generated combines with the oxygen that is been in Hale to the body, instead of pure oxygen it will now be carbonxygen, when this combine with haemoglobin it becomes difficult for us to breath and prevent circulation of oxygenated blood rather carbonoxy blood which is dangerous to the body and may lead to untimely death or other respiratory infection.
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answered by Patron (2,912 points) 4 6 17
edited by
It all depends on how much smoke the stove emits during the cooking process. I've seen some kerosine stove that work almost completely like gas stove with very little smoke emissions. If the opposite was the case, then the risk of landing a respiratory complication is highly possible.

Exposure to smoke in general, especially from burning flames can pose a major health threat to our body by attacking the lungs and other organs primarily responsible for respiration. This is because smoke produce and released by any most of burning fire is usually a mixture of particles and chemicals produced by incomplete burning of carbon containing materials. And as we know, we breath in oxygen which our body is need of to pump air into our system. We then expel carbon dioxide which is in the form of bad air our body rejects. Taking in carbon base air from smokes is a complete reversal of what our body needs. Hence, If we are to put this explanation into consideration, then smoke released by a stove can pose some serious respiratory issues, given that the stove works on kerosine which contains more corrosive elements.

However, as I said above, it depends on the amount and consistency of smoke inhaled. Almost everybody can have a respiratory shut down if they were expose huge amounts of smoke. An instance will be someone stuck in a burning house. In other cases with very little smoke exposure like from a kerosine cooking stove, I'd say It depends on our different body strength. Some people can work around stoves all their lives without having to develop any respiratory issues, while others can't because their body system isn't strong enough to handle it.

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